Pelican spreading its wings in Lantana, Florida/USA

My feathered friends of Lantana 

Lantana/Palm Beach/Florida/USA. (2014) – One of my favorite things to do in Florida is to go
to the pier and watch the pelicans. I totally forget everything else when I watch these big birds
with their famous long beaks and their large throat pouches. I’ve spent hours at days just watching them flying solo or in formation, landing on boats or poles and looking for food. The pelicans at the pier next to the Lantana bridge seem not shy at all but I do show them respect and keep a nice distance when watching them. For the past one and a half year it was not possible to access the
pier on Ocean Avenue in Lantana/South Palm Beach because of reconstruction work on the bridge. In November 2013 the beautiful new bridge was reopened and includes now also fishing piers
and sidewalks. With the reopening also the pier in Lantana was accessible again.
So I finally got to go back again and visit “my feathered friends”, the pelicans of Lantana.
Of course I had my Nikon with me to snap some photos during our reunion.
Pelican eating fish in Lantana, Florida/USA
Pelicans are very successful fisher – These extra large birds “scoop” and “drain”
There are about seven or eight living species of pelicans still to be found worldwide. One of them, the brown pelican – endangered but the population is recovering – can be seen in Lantana. All pelicans are great fisher and get lunch and dinner by carrying out a tricky but very efficient plan. Pelicans fly mostly in flocks and in formations. It’s an amazing sight to see them coming, flying most of the time in a “V” shape formation. After having spotted their prey they start to fly very close over the water surface and by doing so they beat with their wings against the water surface and drive so the fishes into shallow water. From there they just “scoop” them up with their huge beaks. Since the “scooping” always brings not only fish but also a lot of water into their pouch, they have to “drain” the water in their large and very elastic throat pouch before they can swallow the food. Contrary to the opinion pelicans would store their food in their pouches, the only use the very flexible “throat sack” for the draining of the water. Brown pelicans also dive for their dinner or lunch if they have to. One of the facts I’ve learned about these wonderful extra large birds: Pelicans can hold about 3 gallons (about 12 Liter) of water in their bills. Amazing, isn’t it?

GALLERY

  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
  8. Managing Director
  9. Managing Director
  10. Managing Director
  11. Managing Director
  12. Managing Director
  13. Managing Director
  14. Managing Director
  15. Managing Director
  16. Managing Director
  17. Managing Director
  18. Managing Director
  19. Managing Director
  20. Managing Director
  21. Managing Director
  22. Managing Director
  23. Managing Director
  24. Managing Director
  25. Managing Director
  26. Managing Director
  27. Managing Director
  28. Managing Director
  29. Managing Director
  30. Managing Director
  31. Managing Director
  32. Managing Director
  33. Managing Director
  34. Managing Director
  35. Managing Director
  36. Managing Director
  37. Managing Director
  38. Managing Director
  39. Managing Director
  40. Managing Director
  41. Managing Director
  42. Managing Director
  43. Managing Director
  44. Managing Director